A blog that wants to start conversations about policy in Canada. Email: politiquepolicy [@] gmail. com

 

Can reconciliation become real? TRC Alberta Annual Event

On Thursday March 27th 2014 I attended the Truth and Reconciliation Event in Edmonton. It was a powerful experience in both a political and emotional way.

The who’s who of Aboriginal Politics were there: Justice Sinclair, Sean Atleo, Thomas Mulcair, Joe Clark and the Governor General in addition to a host of other leaders.

The survivor stories were moving, and the mingling of hope and pain was intense to say the least.  

The projects and support that are tasked with addressing the impacts of Residential school system range from education grants, addictions treatment to memorial projects.

I was not clear on the why there were honorary witnesses, and why they were such high profile politicians. It started to make the TRC seem like a highly political institution, that was guided by showing face rather than impacting real change. For example, Mayor Naheed Nenshi had tweeted  about being honoured to hear the survivor stories;. although, throughout the survivor speeches he sat engrossed in his I-Pad.

I tend to be skeptical of the pomp and pretentious of politics. It is so easy to post tweets, photos, and comments about political support or even show face at an event but to actually act in the spirit of reconciliation, and the intention of building new relationships is a deeply unsettling notion. I don’t know how long the concept of reconciliation will take to catch on, but it is now up to the general public to take on the challenge of addressing the prejudices and injustices that Aboriginal peoples experience on a daily basis.

Where does politics intersect with policy here to make the road to reconciliation real?

An Act Respecting the Safety of Drinking Water on First Nations Land

Is this a sign of successful indigenous advocacy? what are the policy measures following from this that will create tangible change?

http://www.parl.gc.ca/HousePublications/Publication.aspx?Docid=5409485&file=4

the politics of housing

In the past few months I have been observing the politics of housing unfold in on of Canada’s most sprawling cities - Calgary, Alberta.

As much as prosperity brings a slew of shiny new audis, 4-bedroom homes in bedroom communities and some semblance of economic security it hasn’t in a capitalist economy style improved the quality of living for everyone. What ‘improved’ means here is undefined, and for the purposes of my observations let it mean living a standard of living that includes : enough cash flow for rent, groceries, cloths, public transportation and occasional social outings.

A recent Ipsos-Reid poll that asked the question ‘What would end homelessness?’ resulted in this popular response: give people clothes. Clothes? really? Anyway, I digress.

One swirling issue is that of ‘Secondary Suites’ where a house owner applies to re-zone their house from a single tenancy to a double tenancy status. These secondary suites are typically basements - which for the most part are ‘illegal dwellings’ according to City by-laws. The main planning argument for not approving an increasing in double tenancy homes, would increase the number of people parking on the street and this congestion would just be too much for bedroom-communities to handle.

The congestion argument, as you can imagine, is cloaked by a sense that housing Calgary’s low-income population is nobody’s problem but those who cannot locate reasonable and safe housing.

Post the June 2013 flood, safe and affordable housing has become a hot-button issue that is on the top of Naheed Nenshi’s mind. As well as the Calgary Residential Renter’s Association, in addition to various non-profit organizations supporting the project to end homelessness.

These are all observations, so far, sorry I will get back to my main point.

If a City that requires all kinds of people employed in low and high end positions requires all of these people to be housed to keep it’s great big economic engine going, why not make it easier to live here?

Are people actually afraid of that new basement neighbour and their street-parked pick-up truck? or are they nervous that they are living in a Calgary that they didn’t plan for?

On a broader scale - how should citizens be involved in shaping Housing Policy? Should governments (municipal, provincial and federal) step in the way they did in the 70s and create low-income housing opportunities  ?

Who knows - I will be interested to see how this pans out and is used for political meat in this upcoming elections. *puts on the popcorn and turns on my non-existent tv*

policy conferences - the new peace making ground?

In it’s most junior form, capitalism was thought to bring order and peace to society. As capitalism increased across the western and eastern world, way back in the day, large-scale war fare reduced. Civilization needed to be combative through trading resources rather than trading sword wounds.

What I do think is interesting is how policy - the operation of politics - has the potential to act as a grounds for consensus building, re-visioning and maybe even peace-making.

There are conferences like Model UN, Defence Consortiums and even the Couchiching Institutes upcoming conference “Coming Together as One: Navigating the Relationship Between Indigenous Peoples and Canada”. These venues promote the idea that they uniquely provide a space for policy capacity building and knowledge sharing to improve relations amongst competing parties.

One could argue that policy conferences have very little practical application as they are often lead by professors, and other public intellectuals who may not understand the lived-experience of many issues. This may lead one to believe that the discussions are only useful in that context.

Do policy conferences have the power to bring peace?

 

amikwa:

Today we lost a great man and warrior for first nation rights in Canada.
R.I.P. Elijah Harper.
Miigwetch for your stand against the Meech Lake Accord and serving not just First Nations but the Canadian population as a government representative.
May Creator guide you in your next journey.

amikwa:

Today we lost a great man and warrior for first nation rights in Canada.

R.I.P. Elijah Harper.

Miigwetch for your stand against the Meech Lake Accord and serving not just First Nations but the Canadian population as a government representative.

May Creator guide you in your next journey.

Can federalism have feelings?

The fraternity of federalism is what characterizes the Canadian political structure.

When conceptualizing that fraternity, James Madison sought to create a collective out of many particulars. In doing so, our founding myths and sense of nationalism are the sinew that binds us together as a nation.

On the eve of Victoria day, and in the midst of renaissance of Indigenous activism I begin to wonder how well as a federation we care for each other.

The components of modern federalism include - fiscal arrangements, political and legal responsibilities, and myths that instruct the why behind the -because I am Canadian. To be honest, the programs and administrative function of the federal government don’t always seem to be the most relevant to daily Canadian life.

Are we a compassionate nation for our brethren because we redistribute wealth through taxation? because we like the idea of public education and health care? because we share some history as a colony?

I am still not sure, but in my experience with the study of federalism the piece of the puzzle that makes us all Canadian quite often seems untouchable or irrelevant. I am also puzzled how a nation, that hopes to build relationships between Canadians, new immigrants, Indigenous communities in the spirit of nation-to-nation partnerships expects to do so using a framework that doesn’t allow much room for empathy and understanding.

 Is it time to start practicing a federalism of compassion?

Inspiration

peuplesvisibles:

Harper ‘skeptical’ of inquiry into missing aboriginal women - ‘It is time to pass to action’ instead of studying issue further, says prime minister

” (…) During a question-and-answer session hosted by the Council for Foreign Relations, Harper was asked by a member of Human Rights Watch about the prospects of a federal inquiry into missing and murdered aboriginal women.“I remain very skeptical of commissions of inquiry generally. My experience has been they almost always run way over time, way over budget, and often the recommendations prove to be of limited utility,” he replied.Harper said the issue has been studied extensively, and that “it is time to pass to action.” (…)”

(CBC News Manitoba - 16/05/2013)

peuplesvisibles:

Harper ‘skeptical’ of inquiry into missing aboriginal women - ‘It is time to pass to action’ instead of studying issue further, says prime minister

” (…) During a question-and-answer session hosted by the Council for Foreign Relations, Harper was asked by a member of Human Rights Watch about the prospects of a federal inquiry into missing and murdered aboriginal women.

“I remain very skeptical of commissions of inquiry generally. My experience has been they almost always run way over time, way over budget, and often the recommendations prove to be of limited utility,” he replied.

Harper said the issue has been studied extensively, and that “it is time to pass to action.” (…)”

(CBC News Manitoba - 16/05/2013)

deeprogueram:

Our Game of Thrones-inspired House Sigils for Canada’s Liberal Leadership candidates. Click through to see the full gallery.

A winner is coming April 14. Freakin’ finally. 

I am looking forward to the election tomorrow - and especailly if it is game of throwns themed.

bearing270:

Ralph Klein died on Friday March 29th at a Calgary care home he had been living in for the last two years. Klein was the 12th Premier of Alberta and served a somewhat controversial fourteen years. 
Follow and join in on the discussion on r/CanadaPolitics.

bearing270:

Ralph Klein died on Friday March 29th at a Calgary care home he had been living in for the last two years. Klein was the 12th Premier of Alberta and served a somewhat controversial fourteen years. 

Follow and join in on the discussion on r/CanadaPolitics.